Exploring the Underwater World with OrcaTorch D710V UV Dive Light

Exploring the Underwater World with OrcaTorch D710V UV Dive Light

Why is SIDE MOUNT Diving Popular? Reading Exploring the Underwater World with OrcaTorch D710V UV Dive Light 2 minutes Next OrcaTorch D630 v2.0 Canister Dive Light Review: Illuminating the Depths

If you've ever gone night diving and enjoyed the beautiful glow of underwater life, you're probably still talking about how amazing it was with your friends. Today, with the aid of modern technology, there's another captivating underwater adventure awaiting enthusiasts – the use of ultraviolet UV dive light during dives.

the use of ultraviolet (UV)light during dives



Scientists have long observed certain marine life glowing when exposed to ultraviolet UV dive light. Further research unveiled that this phenomenon is attributed to specific proteins or chlorophyll absorbing the fluorescent and emitting radiant shades of green, yellow, and sometimes red.

To comprehend this process, let's delve into the nature of light. As humans, our vision is confined to the blue to red wavelength zone, with ultraviolet existing beyond the blue and infrared beyond the red. Traditional incandescent dive lights emit light across various wavelengths, appearing to favor red over blue. In contrast, white LED dive lights exhibit a balance with a slightly stronger presence of blue, lending them a bluish hue.

our vision is confined to the blue to red wavelength zone, with ultraviolet existing beyond the blue and infrared beyond the red

For observing fluorescence underwater, a specialized LED lamp is essential, emitting light in a narrow range. These lamps are available in blue and ultraviolet variants. While ultraviolet light remains unseen to the human eye, blue light is vividly apparent.

Here's the fascinating part – shining white light on a marine organism typically reflects red light, making it appear red. However, when exposed to blue light, some organisms illuminate in green, yellow, or red. This intriguing phenomenon is known as fluorescence, with distinct color displays unique to fluorescing marine life.

Until recently, blue LED dive lights were the norm, but their intense brightness often obscured fluorescence. Divers resorted to yellow filters to block out the excess blue light. The discovery, however, is that ultraviolet light proves most effective. While not visible to divers, marine animals react to it, emitting vibrant colors without the need for a filter.

Given the relatively recent discovery of fluorescent marine life, there's much to explore. OrcaTorch offers ultraviolet dive lights. The D710V, powered by 21700 battery, is only with white and red LED, but also with a 395 nanometer ultraviolet LED.


Leave a comment

All comments are moderated before being published.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.